Day 21 of Isolation…#157

In 1918, the flu Pandemic changed many lives in Alabama my home state an estimated 37,000 people died of the Spanish Flu , one of them was my grandmother. They prepared her burying her the next day; my daddy was 15 years old. Her death changed his life and the lives of his future family forever. It takes only one act to do this, and her death robbed me of a wonderful woman.
Today I have been self-quarantined 3 weeks; I had a replacement valve in February of this year. I had to be careful of colds, but now it is total isolation. If I contract the corona virus, I am in an age group that will most likely not survive. It is my understanding that people 80 and above with underlying health issues will be told to stay home without the offer of a respirator. Bottom line, if I get it I will die. This is why no one comes in or out. My children are leaving food on my patio.
The stores that did deliver have now cut out home delivery, the elderly are cut off from the food they need. Amazon is backlogged that they have no stock; one would never think that this would happen. Stores are closing and many will never reopen. There would not be a shortage of anything, but the citizens of Wisconsin decided to get greedy and are clearing out the stores quicker than trucks can deliver it. To see rows and rows of shelves empty is mind-blowing.
As a writer I am alone most of my time with an occasional breakfast or luncheon, now that is gone. They say stay in 14 days, but after 14 days you can get out and still get the virus, we have a non-ending problem and I fear for a long time.  One of my daughters said to me that there was no bread. My answer was to bake her own, well that did not get a very good response. We need to learn to live without many things.

We have turned into a soft nation!

 

 

©elizabethannjohnsonmurphree

18 thoughts on “Day 21 of Isolation…#157

  1. I hope you are staying healthy Elizabeth, these are tough times, but our parents went through tougher times…. with resilience and self determination, we are capable of coping…((Hugs))

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Interesting and unexpected times. Like you, I will be staying away from others – too many health issues to be able to deal with the virus. Our local hospital is turning people away. We have two cases in our small town. Better to stay isolated. Your post touches on many of the challenges of this time. We must now draw on different resources. Well said.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. I feel you. I have been self quarantined for 13 days now for similar reasons. As a writer, I also am used to being alone much of the time. But this feels different – not actaully my choice – so much different dynamic. Take care of yourself.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. What a shame! Bread is so easy too, especially keto breads…some can be made in 90 seconds!
    I’m sorry you’ve been trapped in isolation. I’m sorry they’ve made you feel that scared. I still visit my dad at his house or bring him to mine and he’s 85 with Parkinson’s. The other day, I took him to the park to sit and watch ducks. He is fine. I don’t think it’s as serious as they are saying, but I understand your fear. I would let your kids in if they are well, or you yourself could sit out on your patio or porch.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. I was wondering about you. You’re doing the right thing. Staying home is the only solution. Dire as it may seem, it will not last forever. Stores are cutting out home delivery now? Friends in France told me the same. Systems are just saturated. It’s not happened here yet, so we take advantage of the on-line shopping while it’s working.
    Stay safe, Elizabeth.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes, I as well have taken advantage of online shopping. One of my grocery stores stop delivery, the other is backed-up about four days…I put in an order hoping it want stop. I am much better, but self-quarantined. Thank you so much for your kind words. I have editing some poetry and posting, my attention span is short, as I get tired easily. Hugs E.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Back-ups are to be expected. As can be expected some of the stores “beefing up” their computer systems and deliveries. Meantime… “Faire le dos rond”. Not too sure how this translates into English. Hunch your shoulders until the bad weather goes away.
        Take advantage of the slow time, there is no rush… Not ‘ny more. No, ma’am… Be safe. Hugs back

        Liked by 1 person

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